UK DOBERMANN - EUROPEAN DOBERMANN
EAR CROPPING-EAR POSTING-HEALTH ISSUES

  UK DOBERMANN FORUMS-DOBERMANN BREEDERS
            INFORMATION ON DOG VACCINATIONS


The Belgian Shepherd Dog
is unique in the world of dogs as it is the only breed to have four separate varieties. Structurally they are all the same and differ only in coat and colour. There is the long coated black - the Groenendael, the long coated other than black - the Tervueren, the short coated - the Malinois and the rough coated - the Laekenois.

First recognised as a breed in 1891, the Belgian Shepherd Dog was originally bred to herd sheep and is a medium-sized dog that is accustomed to the open-air life and built to resist the cold Belgian climate.

The Belgian Shepherd Dog will usually live for 12 years, but fed the right nutrition and given plenty of loving attention can live up to 15 years of age.



By the harmony of its shape and the proud carriage of head, the Belgian Shepherd Dog must give the impression of a robust elegance that has become the heritage of the selected representatives of a working breed. They combine the valuable qualities of the best guard dog for property with the inborn aptitude for guarding flocks. When necessary they are, without hesitation, an obstinate and ardent protector of their master. Most Belgians love water and will always accompany you for a swim.

Although the Belgian Shepherd Dog has a relatively low maintenance coat they still need regular attention to enable them to look their best and feel comfortable. A good brush every couple of days when shedding or once a week when not shedding will keep matts from appearing and will make your dog feel comfortable as well as look its best.

Please take note:
The Belgian Shepherd Dog forms strong bonds with its owner and so is more sensitive to its owner's needs. Therefore a Belgian needs to "live with" its family rather than in isolation somewhere in the grounds or left in the house alone for many hours a day. If the dog has to spend a lot of time on its own it might benefit from a companion.

When investigating the purchase of a Belgian Shepherd Dog care needs to be taken to ensure that all breeding stock has been X-rayed for Hip Dysplasia and are suitable for breeding. Viewing the parents of your potential puppy is an excellent idea as it can give an idea of what your puppy may possibly develop into. It is also extremely important to socialise your puppy with people, dogs, other animals and as many different situations as possible to ensure a well-adjusted and happy pet.


The Bichon Frise
is a French and Belgian breed. Originally popular with the French aristocracy, the breed fell from favour during the French revolution. The Bichon Frise then worked for a living by performing with organ grinders and other street musicians.

During World War I, the Bichon Frise almost became extinct and it was only the dedication of the French and Belgian breeders, which saved the breed.

The Bichon Frise was first introduced into Australia in the 1970s and since its introduction has proved successful in the show ring and equally successful as a companion dog.

The Bichon Frise has a superb temperament. It is an ideal companion dog, friendly, affectionate and enjoys contact with its human family. It should be primarily an indoor dog because of its devotion to the family. The Bichon Frise is not particularly suited to living outside.

It is always ready to play a game, take a walk, or just snuggle up for a cuddle. A breed with a wonderful attitude for life, they make an ideal companion for young and old alike.

The Bichon Frise adapts well to other pets if reared with them, or introduced to them gradually. It will cope with both cats and other dogs quite well.

The Bichon Frise is suited to anyone who wants a companion dog. The breed is considered to be "non-allergenic", by many people, and so may be the ideal dog for people with allergy problems. It is suggested, however, to visit the breeder and have contact with the dogs before purchasing to ensure that they suit if allergies are a problem.

You will not find a better dog than the Bichon Frise. A small, attractive dog, with a big dog attitude, they quickly win the hearts of everyone they meet. They love life, love people, and with regular care will reward their owners with years of love and devotion.

The Bearded Collie
has evolved during hundreds of years to perform specialised tasks in the service of man and was first bred by sheep farmers to work the rugged ranges of the Scottish Highlands. As its working ability was all that mattered, there was no concern for accurately recording their history. It is possible that the very early origins of the Bearded Collie may be found in the Polish Lowland Sheepdog, although this connection is not documented.

A Bearded Collie will normally live to 15 years of age.



Bearded Collies are happy, lively, energetic and affectionate family dogs. Visit a Beardie at home and you may well find it curled up on a couch or helping out in the kitchen. These dogs love to be where the action is and adapt easily to almost any situation. Most of all, Beardies love company and are not happy if locked outside and ignored. The breed is extremely affectionate and expects a lot of loving attention. These are sensitive dogs and do not respond well to harsh treatment. Generally speaking, do not expect a Bearded Collie to be much of a guard dog. They may bark at the doorbell, but will probably welcome burglars as if they were your best friends.

Its beautiful coat does require some work to keep it looking glamorous. Compared with a smooth coated dog, a Beardie does need consistent and frequent grooming, however, unlike some long coated breeds, a thorough brush and comb through once a week will keep an adult Beardie in pretty good condition. Make sure that you keep your dog flea free, groom it regularly, keep it happy and in good health and your Beardie will thrive.

Please take note:
Unless your dog is to be a member of your family, the Bearded Collie is probably not the dog for you.


 

Bullmastiffs
were bred to catch, pin and hold down poachers in the forests of England. The gamekeepers needed an agile, strong and obedient dog, so they crossed the English Mastiff and the British Bulldog. These dogs were more aggressive than is considered either necessary or acceptable in today's Bullmastiff.

Bullmastiffs have a more independent mindset than many of the other guarding breeds. This extremely impressive animal can be very gentle or a total clown. They can also curl up napping or viewing television with children. Each Bullmastiff has a personality of its own. The true Bullmastiff character should exhibit dignity, alertness, intelligence, stability and loyalty. They should be neither too assertive nor too passive.

The Bullmastiff's favourite spot in the house or yard is the one that will afford the best overall view of its territory. It may appear to be at ease, while still being extremely aware of the slightest changes that occur. The Bullmastiff has an innate talent for distinguishing who belongs on the property and who is an intruder.

Obedience training is a must for such a large and powerful dog, in order for it to happily co-exist in the average household. The prime factor in training a Bullmastiff is consistency.

The coat requires minimal work to keep it in good condition. It is a waterproof jacket that for the most part manages to look impressive, even with very little attention. Brushing several times a week will take care of any loose hairs, while regular use of a rubber hound glove will apply pressure all over the body to stimulate the flow of oil and massage the skin to a healthy condition. Exercise is necessary and important, however, Bullmastiffs need only a limited amount of exercise to keep fit and healthy. Never over exercise a Bullmastiff, especially in its formative first year.

Please take note:
Generally Bullmastiffs are not jumpers, however, they can, with provocation, jump high fences - so 1.5-metre high fences are the absolute minimum. All Bullmastiffs need to have a suitable kennel for when the need arises. Certain health conditions, such as Entropian and Hip Dysplasia, can occur in Bullmastiffs, as with some other breeds. Contact breed experts or vets for additional information.


The Boxer originated from the smaller type of Bullenbeisser, which was a type of Bulldog used for bear and bull baiting. When this practice was banned the Boxer became an escort and protection dog. The British Bulldog contributed to the development of the modern Boxer, but this took place before the modern low-slung British Bulldog evolved.

Particularly tolerant and protective of children, the Boxer loves to join in their games whenever the opportunity arises. Even in old age, a Boxer never fails to be interested in family activities - in short, this is a fun-loving, energetic dog with a way of edging itself into the hearts of all those who come to know it.

The Boxer has a stable temperament. It should be a calm self-assured dog, not easily disturbed or given to extremes of temperament such as shyness, aggressiveness or over excitability. This breed is generally obedient and easily taught.

Boxers have all the desirable qualities to make them the ideal family dog. In particular, they are renowned for their great love and faithfulness to master and household, making them a fearless protector of all.

Very good.

For those people prepared to look after an energetic and fun-loving dog.



 is a combination of balanced power, grace and agility. It desires human companionship and its character and individuality win it lifelong friends. It is very devoted to its family. The Bull Terrier has an innate sense of humour, brains, imagination, personality, and to those who love it – beauty. Its appearance, along with its character, is unique in the spectrum of dogs. The character and personality of the Bull Terrier is very complex.

A Bull Terrier is very active and acts similar to a child and so you must be prepared for anything, and you must supervise it. Activity is a common characteristic in nearly every young Bull Terrier. All puppies are extremely busy and many Bull Terriers remain active and playful until well into middle age (5 to 6 years). A Bull Terrier will not do well in a situation where it is expected to remain alone in the home or yard for long periods of time.

A Bull Terrier sheds its coat twice a year. Loose hair can be removed with a daily rub-down using a special glove or brush. Nails and dewclaws should be checked monthly and clipped with dog nail clippers. Bull Terriers are natural sun-bakers and care should be taken in the hotter months to apply sunscreen.

A Bull Terrier requires a securely fenced, average to large sized back yard and it will take exception to being chained or tied up, and they require a considerable amount of human companionship.

Please take note:
Although generally healthy, Bull Terriers can be prone to skin allergies, particularly those caused by insect bites. Pups should be checked for deafness.


The Chihuahua is the world's smallest dog and its history is shrouded in mystery. Some believe that it originated in Asia, others that it came from Europe. But no matter where the breed got its start, it really is a dog of Mexico. Figurines found in Chi-Chen-Itza, Colima, and other ruined cities of the South American continent are very much like the present day Chihuahua. This coupled with the fact that in several Mayan dialects "chi" means dog, would seem to place the ancestors of the Chihuahua in the Mayan period.

There are two types of Chihuahua:
The Smooth Coat – featuring a soft, glossy coat that is placed well over the body with a ruff on neck.
The Long Coat – featuring a flat or sometimes slightly curly coat and a long, full tail.

15cm - 20cm
2kg - 3kg

The Chihuahua is truly a companion animal and therefore thrives on the company of other animals. It will stand up for itself, but if you do have big dogs in the home it is best to keep an eye on this little dog while it is playing with them just to make sure all is well.

Being such a small dog, it is well suited to almost all types of living environments. They are especially ideal for heavily populated cities and can be happily housed in a small flat, but some outdoor exercise is still a must.

If you have decided that the Chihuahua is the dog for you and you are prepared to enforce its diet so that it does not become obese, then contact one of the groups listed below:


This merry little dog makes a wonderful family friend and a devoted companion. It thrives on, and needs the companionship of human beings.

Good.

For those who understand that this little dog needs exercise and grooming.

The Collie originated first appeared along the border areas of Northern England and Scotland and is thought to have been introduced by the Roman invaders many years ago. The origin of the name "Collie" is said to be derived from the word "coally", as earlier Collies were predominantly black and white. Another theory suggests they were named after the black-faced 'Collie' sheep that were guarded by these loyal dogs. There are two types of Collies; the Rough Collie and the Smooth Collie – each named after their style of coat.

Up to 14 years of age.

Being a friendly dog, the Collie enjoys the company of other animals. However, it does possess a natural herding instinct that can compel it to 'round up' the other animals in the home from time to time.

With an abundance of intelligence, friendliness and an inherent desire to please, Collies make terrific lifelong companions for all types of people and their situations. Like most dogs, the Collie thrives on lots of love and affection from its owner. Their gentle nature makes them an ideal pet for most homes and situations – especially when given ample exercise and space to move.

If you have decided that Collie is the pet for you and you want more information, contact one of the groups listed below:

The origin of the Dachshund has been lost in antiquity and there is much conjecture as to its origin. However, it is generally accepted that the breed came to prominence in Germany where it was used by foresters and noblemen to hunt badger, fox and rabbits in dense forests where a larger animal would have difficulty in pursuing its quarry. The Dachshund is a unique breed in that there are three different coats, Long, Wire and Smooth and two sizes, Standard and Miniature. These varieties were each developed for a specific purpose, mainly depending upon the type of terrain encountered in their district of origin.Today's Dachshund in Australia and England is not normally used for hunting and is only bred as a faithful companion or show dog.

The Dachshund is first and foremost a sporting dog, but it is remarkably versatile – being equally adaptable as a house pet. The breed's temperament and acute intelligence makes them the ideal companion for town or country. They have retained a keen hunting instinct that is quickly brought to the surface at the sight of a rabbit or fox. Each variety is different in temperament. The Smooth tends to be more aloof than the other varieties and generally is very discerning in whom it likes or dislikes.

Dachshunds are strong, hardy and easy to care for. All three varieties require marginal attention, with the smooth variety in particular requiring very little grooming. This is obviously a big advantage for the average dog owning family.The long coat is the more glamorous of the three with long feathering on the ears, underline and tail, giving an appearance of elegance for those who prefer a glamorous coated animal.The wire coat is short and harsh to the touch and the breed is characterised by a beard and bushy eyebrows that gives the Wire its characteristic appearance. Dachshunds get bored hanging around the yard and are enthusiastic eaters, so ensure regular exercise or cut down on food. Dachshunds are quite happy to spend their life on your favourite chair, but for the dogs' wellbeing, regular exercise is recommended.

Please take note:
Because of their long body in relation to their height, and the fact that most Dachshunds love food, it is important not to overfeed. A dog that is too fat is the most likely candidate for a prolapsed disc, which is the most common problem in Dachshunds and tends to occur between five and seven years.

The Dobermann originated in Germany. In the 19th Century a man named Herr Louis Dobermann lived in the city of Apoldo (East Germany) in the principality of Thueringen. He served as the town dog catcher, night patrolman and the rates collector among other duties. There was a demand for fearless watchdogs and Herr Dobermann started selectively breeding the best of the locally available dogs for this purpose. Nobody knows exactly which breeds were originally used, but the Great Dane, old German Shepherd, (not the German Shepherd Dog as we know it today), Weimaraner, Manchester Terrier, Greyhound and other breeds have been mentioned. During a lifetime of 60 years of interbreeding dogs, Herr Dobermann achieved great success in establishing the required watchdog breed of dog. The Dobermann was known as the "Devil Dog" by the American Marines and is their mascot. It earned the name during World War II in the Pacific, where it used to go ashore with the marines and flush out the enemy.Although current research indicates their arrival was in fact a lot earlier, the Dobermann was re-introduced into Australia in 1952.

These sleek and loyal dogs usually live up to 12 years of age, but with the correct care and nutrition will live to 14 years of age.

Good.


This is one of the most ancient breeds of dog to originate in France. They are big, solid dogs that were initially used for hunting large animals such as wild boars and guarding homes and cattle. Unlike other French breeds, the Dogue de Bordeaux was relatively unknown outside their homeland until the middle of the 19th century and is now steadily growing in popularity.

58cm - 68cm
45kg - 50kg

Being a large breed, the Dogue de Bordeaux has a tendency to dominate other pets around the home and is best kept on its own or with its own kind.

Big dogs like the Dogue de Bordeaux are not for everyone, but those who choose to bring one into their home must be sure they can handle a big dog and be prepared to exercise it regularly. Those who are prepared to put in the hard work with this dog will certainly be rewarded with a devoted and affectionate companion.

English Setters are gun dogs. The breed was known in England in Elizabethan times, although the modern English Setter was developed only during the last century. Used by hunters to locate upland game such as quail and partridge, the breed is enthusiastic when at work, having a keen game sense. In the field it ranges out from the hunter and on locating game, drops before it in a crouch. This instinct is still strong in lines bred both for the show ring and as companions. English Setters look forward to and enjoy their exercise, however once the daily walk is over they are quite content to curl up at their owner's feet, or better still, on their owner's bed!

English Setters normally live to 10 years of age, but in the right environment and given the right nutrition will live up to 12 years of age.

Being such good-natured dogs, English Setters will live happily with most pets. They are social animals and are best kept with another dog.

If you have a young family and want them to grow up with a reliable, even-tempered dog, and if you enjoy regular exercise and quality time with a loyal, good natured companion, then the English Setter is for you.

The pendulous ears, soft gentle expression, sturdy build and friendly, wagging tail proclaim the English Springer Spaniel unmistakably as a member of the ancient family of spaniels. It is the largest of the land spaniels and was originally used to find and spring game for the nets, or the falcon carried by hunters.

This ancient breed of dog normally lives to 10 years of age, but kept in a loving and caring home and given the right food can live up to 12 years of age.

Excellent.

Those who are prepared to give their dog plenty of attention.

The German Shepherd did not exist prior to 1899. The founder of the breed, Captain Max von Stephanitz, bred the dogs to work. This is still a priority with many breeders today, coupled with the need for a sound body, along with the trusted and loyal temperament that makes the German Shepherd such an ideal companion.

The German Shepherd is known throughout the world for its loyalty and trustworthiness. As a working dog it is able to act as a guardian, herder, tracker, and guide. The German Shepherd should never be nervous, over aggressive or shy.

With proper introduction and discipline, German Shepherds do get on with other pets. The secret is early socialisation. It is most important that puppies be exposed to new experiences from as early as eight weeks of age.

The ideal owners of German Shepherds are people who are able to be assertive and command respect from their dog - while respecting the dog back in return. These people are usually very active and enjoy the company of their dog without making a fuss or expecting lap dog behaviour.

The smart looking German Wirehaired Pointer is closely related to the shorthaired variety. It originated in Germany in the 19th century and was bred for their usefulness in retrieving fallen game from the water. The Wirehaired is also known as the Drahthaar. The breed standards for the German Pointers were first drawn up in 1879 and there has since been an emphasis on improving the breeds.

This breed of dog usually lives up to 12 years of age but can live to 14 years with the proper care and diet.

55cm - 64cm
28kg - 45kg

It’s a lively and vigorous animal so be aware that some may try to dominate other animals in the home, but most will get along well with other dogs. They make great watchdogs and will alert you immediately to anyone coming on to your property.


55cm - 76cm
24kg - 32kg

The greyhound will get along with most other pets so long as it is given its own space. Its natural instincts may compel it to round up any smaller animals around the home from time to time.


Originally bred as a hunting dog, the German Shorthaired Pointer is one of the world's most popular dogs. This active breed was first developed during the 17th century by crossing the Spanish Pointer and the Bloodhound. The result was a loyal, active dog capable of sniffing out game throughout the wilds of Europe. The dog was first registered by the German Kennel Club in 1872 and its popularity continues to grow around the globe.

This robust dog normally lives up to 16 years of age.

These agreeable dogs will get along with most pets in the home, especially when raised together from an early age. Like most hunting breeds, they may enjoy the occasional (but harmless) chasing game with smaller pets.

Being an active dog, the German Shorthaired Pointer needs plenty of space to roam and explore and is best suited to a home environment with a large backyard. Owners must be prepared for regular, lengthy exercise sessions.

The Golden Retriever was first developed at the Scottish county estate of Lord Tweedmouth, during the 1860s, to assist in the retrieving of upland game and waterfowl. They were first imported and registered in Australia during the 1930s.

The Golden Retriever is an intelligent, affectionate dog, both active and powerful, with a kindly expression. The instinct to retrieve is still an important characteristic of the breed, however, the Golden Retriever's willing, adaptable nature and physical attributes make it an exceptionally versatile breed. It has been used in a wide range of activities such as gundog, guide dog for the blind, therapy pet, obedience and show dog.

Excellent.

Families looking for a dog with a gentle and loving disposition.

The Hungarian Vizsla is the national dog of Hungary. Its early origins are hard to trace, but its history began in the 9th century when the warring Magyar tribes migrated from the Steppes of Asia and eventually settled in what is known today as Hungary.

For centuries the Vizsla was owned by the sporting nobility of Hungary and, before firearms were introduced in the 1700s, was used to scent and search for birds that were then either caught by falcons or netted. Subsequently a gun dog with all-round ability, which could work on fur or feather, was required to work the plains of Hungary with its varying vegetation of thick crop cover, tall grasslands and cornfields.

The dog needed to be fast and possess a "good nose" which would enable it to work the giant hare and to "point" to the various game birds and wildfowl. It was also used to hunt deer, wild boar and wolf, all of which it was expected to hold at bay. This was usually done using several dogs working together. A dog of above average ability was necessary and, in the Vizsla, the Hungarians had such a dog. The first Vizsla arrived Australia from the UK in 1973.

Hungarian Vizslas live from between 10 to 12 years of age.

Good.

Suitable for most people and it is good with children.

The origin of the Irish Setter is not known, although it is believed that it evolved from a combination of land spaniels. These were imported to Ireland from Spain when the Spaniards helped the Irish in their rebellion against the British. It should be noted that this breed (which was established as early as 1800) was not originally a solid colour, but a combination of red and white. Through selective breeding the rich, mahogany red colour we know today was derived.Irish Setters were originally used to "set" game, hence the name "setters". They found upland birds and crouched down close to their find so that the hunter could come and throw a net over dogs and birds. When firearms were introduced, this practice was discontinued, as the hunter wanted a dog that pointed, flushed game and hunted with an upright stance.

Irish Setters live from between 10 to 14 years of age.

Good.

 
An active dog, the Irish Setter requires a certain amount of daily exercise and attention to grooming.

The ancestry of the Irish Terrier goes back into the mists of time, and long ago it was used by the Irish farmers as a worker, a guard dog for the family and a wonderful companion. It has a heart three sizes too big for its shaggy body; a heart that is as white and clean as that of a knight-errant. There is a psychic side of the Irish Terrier too, found in almost no other dog, a tinge of the mysticism of the land of his ancestry.

As mentioned, they are a wonderful companion, intelligent, affectionate and a great family dog. They make a good show dog although most people who purchase an Irish Terrier want them solely for their happy and fun nature. They can be trained at an early age to be an obedience dog.

They can be equally at home with cats, birds and other dogs, although if a male he does not take kindly to other outside males on his property.

Single people, married couples, or families looking for a loving and devoted companion.

The origin of the Irish Wolfhound has been lost in antiquity, however, from illustrations dating back to 1400 BC we know that the Celts had huge hounds. Irish mythology, legends and sagas abound with the exploits of this ancient breed. This dog was the companion of kings - whether at war, on the hunt or just by the hearth. History tells of many hounds being sent to the royal houses of both Europe and Scandinavia. The breed has also come close to extinction.

The Irish Wolfhound is often called the "gentle giant" of the dog world. Its proud bearing, quiet dignity and intelligence are just some of its many wonderful characteristics. This is definitely a family dog with an incredibly affectionate nature, which thrives on human companionship. Regardless of whether you are looking for a Wolfhound with show potential or one as a companion and family pet it should be physically and temperamentally healthy, exhibiting the friendly even disposition that is essential to its character.

The Wolfhound will live happily with cats, rabbits and other domestic animals if introduced to them as a puppy - however, one must always remember that this dog is a sight hound.

Families.

The Reverend Jack Russell was very interested in fox hunting and saw the need for a small terrier to be used to flush out foxes that had gone to ground. In 1814 he acquired a terrier bitch named Trump from the local milkman which became his foundation bitch – and so the breed was born.The first Jack Russells were quite tall dogs (35cm) but during the years the breed has changed, and there are now two distinct varieties that are recognised as separate breeds – the Parson Jack Russell and the Jack Russell Terrier. There are three coat varieties, a smooth coat, a broken coat and a rough coat.

Jack Russell Terriers are great little hunting dogs that will tackle anything from a fox to a mouse. They spend a large amount of time investigating their surroundings and when taken for a walk in the country will hunt for hours. They are extremely intelligent and as a result, beginning to make their presence felt in the obedience ring.

Jack Russells make ideal house dogs, but are equally at home as outside dogs.



Please take note:
The inquisitive nature of this breed necessitates having good fencing in order to contain them.


This small breed is a recent development in Japan where its ancestors have been kept as "family dogs" since ancient times. It is thought that the Japanese Spitz originated from the "Peat Dog" that spread from the Swiss Lakes and from Finland ABOUT 6000 years ago, before finally reaching Japan and China by 400 A.D.

The first Japanese Spitz arrived in Australia in 1979. Although the Japanese Spitz is now well established it is still a relatively unknown and rare dog in Australia.

The Japanese Spitz is a family dog and it thrives on human companionship. It is an intelligent breed always eager to please. In temperament, it is wary of complete strangers rushing up to it without formal introduction. It prefers a gentle approach, after that you have a friend for life. It is characterised by its great courage, intelligence and liveliness and is an affectionate, devoted companion.

As a companion dog the Japanese Spitz should be familiarised with other household pets at an early age and it will then live happily and reliably with them. The Japanese Spitz has a dominant nature and when introduced to a household with other breeds may very quickly become "the boss", even over much larger breeds.

The Japanese Spitz is a family dog seeming to thrive on the different attention and affection from each family member. A young puppy (3 to 12 months) could be a "handful" for children under five years of age without adult supervision. Having said that, they also make an excellent and loving companion for a single person in a flat

These little dogs are sometimes known as the Royal Spaniels due to being great favourites of the Stuart kings. Accompanied by a rippling sea of dogs wherever he went, the King's deathbed was cluttered with them, much to the consternation of the attending Archbishops. Signs "Beware of the Dogs" that appeared in the Royal chambers meant "don't tread on them".The King Charles was most probably bred from dogs brought to England from Japan, and crossed with local breeds and then with a Pyrame Spaniel brought from France. The King Charles Spaniel, which ranks among the rarer breeds in Australia, should not be confused with its larger cousin, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

King Charles Spaniels live from between 9 to 15 years of age.

The King Charles Spaniel will share with others, as long as the others realise it is "King".

Ideally Charlies are suited to an adult household. While good with all ages, this breed prefers adult company.


    


BACKGROUND

    As the name suggests, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel proudly traces its ancestry back to the royal courts of England.

    King Charles II, was devoted to his dogs - almost to the point of addiction. They travelled with him everywhere and the sign "Beware of the Dog" originated in his court, meaning not that they were dangerous, but rather don't tread on them. Contrary to popular belief they do not have free access to all royal parks, palaces and public buildings in England - they just behave as if they do!

AVERAGE LIFESPAN

    Cavaliers can live up to 13 years of age, but, more often than not, will live up to 15 years if cared for with the correct nutrition and given lots of loving attention.

Ruby Coloured Puppy
[ Ruby Coloured Puppy ]
BREED PERSONALITY, CHARACTERISTICS & TEMPERAMENT

    Energetic and loving, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel makes the perfect family pet, but it must be stressed they are dogs that belong with people. They are not dogs to be left alone or housed outside as they thrive on human contact.

    Cavaliers are bred in four colours:
    BLENHEIM: Chestnut markings on a pearly white coat. The markings on the head should be equally divided giving a masked effect and leaving room in the middle for the prized "Blenheim Spot".
    TRI-COLOUR: A black and white dog with tan markings over the eyes, on the cheeks, inside the legs, behind the elbows and on the underside of the tail.
    BLACK AND TAN: Absolutely raven black coat with tan markings over the eyes, on the cheeks, inside the legs, behind the elbows and under the tail.
    RUBY: Whole colour rich red with no white markings at all.

Black and Tan Coloured
[ Black and Tan Coloured ]
COMPATIBILITY WITH OTHER PETS

    Excellent.

CARE REQUIREMENTS

    Apart from all their excellent qualities, they do shed their coat twice a year and have poor road sense, so outside the well-fenced family property they should always be kept on a lead. If you are contemplating buying a Cavalier make certain that your fences are secure as puppies are apt to dig when young, and will find a way out of their yard if it is at all possible.

    Please take note:
    Annual checks and vaccinations are essential, as is regular worming. Your vet will explain the dangers of heartworm and advise on the preventative measures. It should be noted that certain weeds and grasses might have adverse affects too. Regular grooming is necessary to remove excess hair and prevent the coat from matting.

The Lhasa Apso is a small, well-muscled hardy little house dog originating in Tibet and is thought to be descended from the type of dog common for centuries over Central Asia.The name Apso is used in Tibet for both of their smaller longhaired breeds and means longhaired or goat like.

Very good, but being an assertive breed they like to show dominance over other dogs and so care should be taken if introducing another dog into the family.

They are highly intelligent, good with children, assertive with a free and jaunty movement, but wary of strangers and can be sensitive to the moods of their owners.

The correct name for this beautiful toy breed is Maltese (not Maltese Terrier as it is often referred to). No one is certain of the origins of the breed despite claims that they came from the island of Malta, or that they are similar to the dogs worshipped by the ancient Egyptians. There is little doubt though that they are one of the oldest of all dog breeds, with records of this type of dog dating from 6000 BC. They were a prized possession of the people of Malta, as well as an exotic animal of trade in the Middle East.

Maltese live from between 12 to 16 years of age.

Excellent.

Anyone that is looking for a happy live-in companion will find this an excellent choice of dog.

Labradors originated in Newfoundland, off the coast of Canada, and were taken to England on fishing boats in the early 19th century. Here they were developed and bred as a hunting dog, being used for retrieving game in rugged terrain and icy waters. They were popular as tough, strong dogs with excellent scenting powers and a desire to please.

Labrador Retrievers are intelligent, active, fun-loving dogs, eager to please and extremely sociable. They want to be everybody's friend and are not a one-man dog. The breed is wonderful with children and so makes a good watchdog – letting out a big, deep bark to notify of any intruders.

Excellent.


Whatever their size, Poodles are renowned for their intelligence. They are lively dogs with friendly dispositions and make excellent guard dogs.

Excellent.

Almost anyone. The Toy Poodle makes an ideal companion for someone who lives in a small or confined space.

The Pyrenean Mountain Dog (known in America as the Great Pyrenees and in France as Le Grand Chien de Montagnes des Pyrenees) invariably inspires any number of superlative comments. The majestic beauty, dignity, regal bearing and aura of self-confidence which are characteristic of the breed make a lasting impression on the viewer. However, only after one has come to know the Pyrenean Mountain Dog and its unique history does it become apparent that the breed's true and greatest value is not beauty, but the admirable and unique character of the dog. The Pyrenean Mountain Dog is a native of the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. The breed's association with man dates back many centuries, with the physical and mental characteristics of the Pyrenean Mountain Dog remaining virtually unchanged down through the years. Just as it did in the 16th century, so today the Pyrenean Mountain Dog guards the sheep high on the mountain slopes.

In the 17th century, Louis XIV made the strikingly beautiful Mountain Dog the official dog of the French Court. Certainly it takes very little imagination to look at a Pyrenean Mountain Dog in your home and envision it patrolling the pre-Revolutionary chateaux of France and consorting with the lords and ladies of the Court. That the Pyrenean Mountain Dog has always appealed to royalty is illustrated by the fact that both Queen Marie Antionette and Queen Victoria favoured and owned them. It is typical of these dogs to be equally at ease in either an atmosphere of supreme luxury, or on a peasant's doorstep high in the mountains, where life involves arduous work, extreme weather and inadequate diet. Here it is referred to as 'mat dog' by the peasant farmers.

A wonderful disposition, stately bearing, an air of quiet confidence, love and admiration for its masters and judgement of character can be relied upon.

A thorough grooming at least once a week will keep the coat in a manageable condition; however, a bath is required from time to time. The double dewclaws do require clipping every few weeks.

When the British entered Peking for the first time, they found the Empress Tzu'Hai, dead on the floor of her palace, in the Forbidden City, and with five Pekingese dogs guarding her body. The Empress had committed suicide because China was being invaded by troops from the West. Some of her servants and eunuchs had also killed themselves, while others had fled to the hills, taking with them the sacred little Pekingese dogs that had never been seen before outside the walls of the Forbidden City. During the centuries in which the eunuchs had bred the Pekingese for the Emperors, the breed remained cloistered in the Forbidden City at the Summer Palace. The penalty for anyone found with a dog outside these places was death.

The Pekingese is fearless to the point of exasperation as they do not recognise size when they look at another dog or even man. Their loyalty is one of their strongest qualities and they would protect anything they thought belonged to them.

The Pekingese is a breed that can adapt to any breed. As Pekingese are a fearless breed and can stand their ground with any other breed of dogs if they are introduced at a young age growing up together.


Although the Pharaoh Hound expanded its origins in ancient Egypt, it was first brought into Egypt by the Phoenician merchants when they settled on the Mediterranean islands of Malta and Gozo while plying their trade of selling exotic spices. On Malta and Gozo, the breed has been preserved and is known to have existed for about 5,000 years. Remarkably, the physical features of today’s Pharaoh Hound are no different to those depicted in the tombs of ancient Egypt.

This animal will often live up to 14 years of age.

53cm - 64cm
20kg - 25kg

The Pharaoh Hound is an extremely intelligent dog that likes to be the boss. It is quick to assert it’s authority around other animals and careful supervision is recommended.

The Pharaoh Hound is not a dog for everyone. With its extreme intelligence, special understanding and care is required. Potential owners must be prepared for regular and lengthy exercise session if this dog is to remain in top condition.

The Pomeranian is believed to have descended from the Wolf-Spitz type dogs that migrated to Pomerania from the north of Russia and Siberia. It shares common ancestry with other Arctic breeds such as the Samoyed and Keeshond. These early Spitz-type dogs were used as guard and sledge animals. At this stage of development, the breed weighed up to 14kg.The smallest puppies from any litters were often kept as companions and later these smaller Spitz dogs were bred together in an effort to further reduce the size. Pomeranians were established as a breed in the 18th century after they attracted the interest of the English monarchy.

The Pomeranian makes a delightful family member, being extroverted, lively and very intelligent. This breed has not forgotten its Spitz heritage and can be very loyal and protective towards its human family. Compensating for its diminutive size with extreme intelligence and incredible energy, it excels at any type of obedience training.

The Pomeranian has a friendly disposition but as with any new family pet, should be introduced carefully to any other resident companion animals.


Centuries ago, when the first white people arrived in South Africa, they found that the Hottentots at the Cape were using dogs of the Ridgeback type for hunting purposes. The peculiar ridge of hair, running parallel to the spine and in reverse to the rest of the coat, at once distinguished it from other breeds. During the 19th Century big game hunting flourished in Southern Africa, particularly in the area north of the Limpopo River, later to become known as Rhodesia (after its founder Cecil John Rhodes).

Hunters were quick to realise the value and importance of good hunting dogs. In choosing dogs to fill this role, it was natural that they turned to a native breed - the Ridgeback - a dog that had, for generations, proved such a boon to the African Hottentot with his primitive weapons of the chase. The origin of the breed is not definitely known, but the most generally accepted view seems to be that it is the result of crossing the Cuban Bloodhound with the Hottentot hunting dog, the latter supplying the characteristic ridge.

From such a breeding one would expect just such characteristics as the Ridgeback so markedly shows - speed, power, courage, fidelity, and in addition, a remarkable skill in tackling wild animals. Unfortunately for the breed, the name Lion Dog became popular because several big game hunters found them by far the best for lion hunting, and this led many to assume that the dogs were the actual killers of lions, although no dog would have stood a chance in a fight with a lion. Ridgebacks would harass the lion by constant feint attacks until it was held in sheer bewilderment, giving the hunter a shot at close range. With the advent of long range rifles, hunters dispensed with the use of dogs so the Ridgeback has had to turn to its other vocation, that of guard dog.

Rhodesian Ridgebacks live from between 10 to 12 years of age.

It is compatible with other domestic animals, but needs training regarding livestock.


Camel trains from Egypt carried Salukis to all parts of the ancient world along the silk roads. The Saluki is widely recognised as the first of the sighthound breeds and is still unsurpassed for its combination of speed and endurance and is still used as a food provider by some nomadic tribes from Morocco to Asia Minor.

The Saluki is a beautiful connection with the past and is treasured by a relatively small number of devotees as a companion and show dog. Their aristocratic appearance and light, easy movement have made them a favourite with the show judges. They can share an active outdoor life, or while away summer days and winter nights of peaceful partnership. They are equally at ease racing through the open fields, or resting peacefully in the comfort of your home.

Bred to share the family home, Salukis are an extremely gentle breed. A medium sized, moderate dog built for extreme speed and endurance. There are smooth coated and feathered varieties, the latter with silky fringes mainly on the ears and tail. It is a watchdog that will warn of intruders, but will not attack. Salukis are trustworthy, tolerant and are affectionate with children.

Salukis ideally require a large well-fenced yard and their own comfortable sheltered accommodation. A Saluki should be walked regularly, especially if it has to be left alone all day. The Saluki is social, not solitary.

Please take note:
Young Salukis need training in the social graces and the socialisation of pups is extremely important in producing a well-adjusted adult. Lack of human affection, boredom and frustration can produce acts of defiance and destruction.

The Scottish Terrier is one of the descendants of the old Scotch Terrier, along with the Dandie Dinmont, the Cairn, and the West Highland White Terrier. The exact origins of the breed is obscure, but a dog of its general description dates back to some of the earliest records. The low stature and wiry coat have always been important characteristics relating to the original purpose of the breed, which was to hunt and kill the various species of wildlife such as the fox, badger, weasel, and rat that made life hard for the early Scottish farmers and crofters.

The loss of livestock could well have made a huge difference to these folk, whose livelihood depended on the produce from their land, so a dog was developed which had exceptional strength and courage in a compact, tough package. These traits are still the hallmark of the breed today.

The Scottish Terrier is an adaptable little dog, which will fit in with most households. It is not always demonstrative with its emotions, however, its devotion and loyalty to its family are boundless. Although affectionate towards members of its own family, it is every bit the game terrier when strangers or other dogs are involved. If allowed, it will take on any dog, regardless of breed or size that invades its territory.

While they can be extremely tolerant and good-natured regarding the antics of children, it can be cold, and even belligerent with strangers. It really prefers to be a one-man dog and these qualities make the Scottie an excellent watchdog.

The Scottish Terrier can live harmoniously with other pets providing care has been taken in introducing the pets to each other. It is not uncommon to find households where Scotties share living quarters with cats, guinea pigs and other small pets.

The ideal owner of a Scottish Terrier must have the time to devote to the needs of the dog, and a desire to share their life with a canine companion that will more than repay all the love and attention received. From dawn to dusk your every move will be watched and you will be protected and doted upon. As long as a Scottie is treated well, its love for its owner will be undying.

The Shar-Pei originated in China and has a history dating back 2000 years. Although the exact place of origin is unclear, statues indicate they came from somewhere in southern China, Tibet or Dah-Lel. The name Shar-Pei literally translates to mean sand skin. This is from the breed's characteristic harsh coat. Shar-Pei were used as general utility dogs for herding and guarding.

They were also known as tomb dogs, relating to the discovery in ancient tombs of 2000-year-old statues bearing their likeness. When China became a communist country, a tax was brought in that made the keeping of dogs a luxury and basically out of reach of the average farmer. In 1947 the tax was increased and breeding banned. This led to the Shar-Pei becoming an endangered breed and it was listed with the Guinness Book of Records in 1978 as the world's rarest dog. The first registered Shar-Pei were imported into Australia in 1981 with the first litter in 1985.

The average lifespan for a Shar-Pei is 10 to 12 years.

The Shar-Pei is primarily a working dog, although it is placed in the non-sporting classification. Socialisation with other animals is important, as they can be aggressive with other dogs of the same sex. Personality and temperament is an individual thing. Some Shar-Peis will live quite happily around smaller animals and livestock while others may exhibit the natural instinct to hunt. They are generally good with children and other pets when they are reared with them.

Shar-Peis are a one-man dog, although living in a family situation they will love everyone, they will always have their own person and it may not be the one you choose but the one they choose to bond with. The ideal owner will appreciate the loyalty this breed exhibits and also respect its need for space with new situations. They need exercise, socialisation, love and attention to be a happy, well-balanced pet.

The breed's origins are shrouded in mystery, but it is known that these little dogs were raised in palaces by eunuchs for the pleasure of the nobility. Here they sat on satin pillows and had beautiful marble courtyards to run in. Distant relatives of the Shih Tzu are the Pekingese and Tibetan-type dogs.

Every dog has a reason for being: the Shih Tzu's is strictly to give love. They don't hunt, pull, track or attack - they just love to be with you. Although they may bark to let you know someone is at the door, they soon befriend any visitors once they realise they are friend, not foe.

Excellent.


The Saint Bernard is the original and renowned rescue dog of Switzerland. Since the middle of the 17th Century the Hospice du Grand St. Bernard has been home to large mountain dogs that first protected the monks and their belongings, and later were developed to help find and rescue lost travellers.

The breed is friendly, loyal, fun loving (particularly youngsters) and people orientated. Individuals will range from very steady and quiet through to a more cheeky and boisterous personality. It is a breed that loves to please which makes training and socialising your pup from an early age an experience that you will both enjoy. With its history as a protector, many of today's "Saints" will also instinctively watch over the family and belongings, barking at strangers and demanding introduction before allowing that person to enter the home, but it must never be aggressive or fearful.

Like any other dog, it needs to be properly introduced and supervised with any new additions. Once a friendship is forged, most Saints take on a life-long attachment and consider other pets to be a part of their household.

Families, couples, those living alone - just about everybody.

The Schnauzer is an ancient breed. It is the original sheepdog of the Austrian Tyrol. Paintings and tapestries dating back to 1492 show dogs that are not unlike the modern Schnauzers.

The Schnauzer has also been found in statuary, one on a statue in Mecklenborg, Germany. This statue is dated 1620.

"Schnauzer" was the name of the first prize winning Wired-haired pinscher (the breed's previous title) which was exhibited for the first time in 1879 in Hanover.

Because of its desire to work with the shepherds and guard the family home, the traveling merchants of the 15th and 16th centuries used the Schnauzer to guard their wagons as they traveled from village to village.

These dogs had to be of a size not to take up too much room when traveling on top of the wagon but fierce enough to repel possible thieves.

The Miniature and Giant Schnauzers were developed from the Standard Schnauzer.

The Schnauzer is alive, alert and always interested and involved in its environment. They are very inquisitive and intelligent, often being referred to as the dog with the human brain.

Owning a Schnauzer is a lifetime commitment for both you and your dog. If you are not prepared to share your life, your home and your family with your Schnauzer then this is not the breed for you.

Like a child, the Schnauzer needs and thrives on love, devotion and a stable environment. In return you will receive a lifetime of loyalty and companionship.

The Shetland Sheep dog, or "Sheltie" as it is affectionately known, originated from the Shetland Islands where it was used by crofters as a sheep dog. Few Shelties are used today for their original purpose as sheep dogs, but those people who have worked them vouch for their incredible stamina and instinctive ability to herd. They were first introduced into Australia in 1936. Often referred to as a miniature Collie, the Shetland Sheep dog certainly has the overall appearance of the Rough Collie, however, it is a breed in its own right and possesses some minor distinguishing features, apart from the obvious size difference.

Shetland Sheepdogs live from between 12 to 16 years of age.

Excellent. It can live happily with the family cat and will get along with most other dogs.

Almost anyone will benefit from owning a Shetland Sheepdog. The ideal owner is someone who understands the need for occasional grooming.


Siberians should be gentle, reliable and friendly. Their superb temperament makes them good family companions for people of all ages. As a breed, they are affectionate to one and all.

Inherent in the characteristics of the breed is an alert, outgoing and clownish personality. The dog's desire to please, coupled with its inclination to be stubborn and strong-willed, with unrivalled independence, is perhaps a carry-over from its working heritage. Each Siberian has a nature and identity of its own.

Care needs to be taken as this is a true pack animal and needs to know who is boss. If raised with other pets they are fine.

The Siberian Husky is not the ideal breed for everybody, but for those who are prepared to supply the exercise and companionship this breed requires, owning a Siberian can be a richly rewarding

The Swedish Vallhund dates back to 8th Century Sweden where the breed was utilised as farm dogs, primarily for herding cattle. The Swedish Vallhund is known in its native land as Vastgotaspets, which means Spitz of the West Goths. This dog is also known as the Swedish Shepherd.

In Sweden it is believed the Vallhund travelled to Wales with the Viking raiders and went on to become the ancestor of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. The Swedish Vallhund was first introduced into Australia in 1981.

The Swedish Vallhund is a chirpy little working dog, in which the herding instinct is still very evident. An energetic breed, the Vallhund is friendly, active, agile and very intelligent. It responds well to training due to its eager-to-please personality and is very trustworthy with children. These dogs do well at obedience, love agility and are accomplished trackers.

The Swedish Vallhund is quite trustworthy with other dogs.


Bred in the mountainous terrain of Tibet, this ancient breed of dog was originally used for herding flocks of goats and sheep. This sturdy animal was bred to survive the harsh climatic conditions of their homeland which can vary between raging blizzards and blasting sand storms. Their unique round, flat feet are specifically designed to act as snow-shoes to help it get about during the winter.

36cm - 41cm
8kg - 14kg

Being extremely adaptable, the Tibetan Terrier is happy to mingle with other dogs of all shapes and sizes. While adults are not generally tolerant of cats, they can be taught to live in harmony if introduced to each other from an early age.

If you are able to maintain the Tibetan Terrier’s particular grooming requirements and have decided it is the right breed for you, please contact one of the groups listed below:

Man has used dogs to help him hunt for centuries and different types of hounds have evolved to deal with the various prey. Larger, heavier hounds would have been needed to deal with wolves and wild boar, but in areas where small deer, rabbits or hare were hunted, the speedier, more agile Greyhound type of dog would have been more suitable. The more enclosed area meant that a smaller hound would have been preferred over the Greyhound.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the medium-sized running dog appears to have acquired a name of its own - the "whippet" or "snap dog" - and was a popular breed among the working men in the north of the country. These dogs were used for rabbit hunting and later for racing. Whippets became known as "the poor man's Greyhound" and were highly prized possessions, living curled up by the fire and, it is said, often fed better than members of the family. They were expected to earn their keep at race meetings where betting took place, so a dog that lacked speed would not be considered of any value. Only the best bitches would be bred from, and only the fastest dogs used at stud, so once more, the Greyhound type of animal predominated and the Whippet quickly reverted to type.

Whippets live up to 14 years of age.

The vast majority of Whippets are not aggressive towards other dogs. Similar to most animals blessed with great speed, they prefer to use their speed to get out of a fight.


Man has used dogs to help him hunt for centuries and different types of hounds have evolved to deal with the various prey. Larger, heavier hounds would have been needed to deal with wolves and wild boar, but in areas where small deer, rabbits or hare were hunted, the speedier, more agile Greyhound type of dog would have been more suitable. The more enclosed area meant that a smaller hound would have been preferred over the Greyhound.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the medium-sized running dog appears to have acquired a name of its own - the "whippet" or "snap dog" - and was a popular breed among the working men in the north of the country. These dogs were used for rabbit hunting and later for racing. Whippets became known as "the poor man's Greyhound" and were highly prized possessions, living curled up by the fire and, it is said, often fed better than members of the family. They were expected to earn their keep at race meetings where betting took place, so a dog that lacked speed would not be considered of any value. Only the best bitches would be bred from, and only the fastest dogs used at stud, so once more, the Greyhound type of animal predominated and the Whippet quickly reverted to type.

Whippets live up to 14 years of age.

The vast majority of Whippets are not aggressive towards other dogs. Similar to most animals blessed with great speed, they prefer to use their speed to get out of a fight.


The Welsh Springer Spaniel was first recognised by the UK Kennel Club as a breed in its own right in 1902. However, history shows through art and the written word that a "red and white" Spaniel existed from 1560. In Australia records commence in 1973, although there is anecdotal evidence of the breed being in Australia prior to World War II. The Welsh Springer Spaniel is a multi-purpose gundog, primarily flushing out game and retrieving it back to the shooter, either on the land or the water.

The Welsh Springer Spaniel is red and white and does not come in any other colour. It is a busy, active and happy dog, and extremely loyal and loving to its family and it makes a terrific watchdog. Welsh Springer Spaniels may be reserved with strangers, but they should not be timid or shy. Socialisation with pups should begin as soon as possible and continue throughout its life. Training should be fair and consistent, using modern, gentle techniques. It should be kept in a well-fenced yard, as they have been known to wander once they put their nose to the ground. They require daily exercise and stimulation and if left alone in the back yard, may result in excessive barking and destructive behaviour.

Welshies are a fairly good with other dogs and cats, provided the owners are consistent and thoughtful to the hierarchy of the household. However, bear in mind that it is a gundog and will show a "real interest" in birds and rabbits.


The Pembroke Corgi originated from the hardy, bob-tailed cattle dogs of the Pembrokeshire area in Wales. Due to being chosen as a pet by the British Royal Family in 1935, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is now one of the best-known breeds in the world. It is highly successful in both show and obedience rings worldwide, and extremely popular as a family pet.

The Cardigan Corgi - the Corgi with the tail - is one of the oldest of the Welsh dog breeds and is generally acknowledged as being the original Corgi or dwarf dog of Wales. Since ancient times it was used as a sheep and cattle herder, a guard dog, and friend and companion in the lonely crofters' huts of the remote Welsh hillside country of Cardiganshire.

Pembroke:
The breed's heritage endows it with all those valuable instincts of a working dog and the independent spirit that originally enabled it to control the Welsh cattle without undue direction from its masters. It is truly man's best friend and helper.

Cardigan:
The Cardigan Corgi, with its ancient lineage, has retained its individual character, particularly its steady and sensible nature. A Cardigan is equally at home on a large property or in a smaller suburban yard, and with its exceptionally sensitive hearing makes a wonderful watchdog.

The Corgi's beautiful short coat requires only a quick brush to keep it clean and shiny and an occasional comb to keep the undercoat and skin in good condition. Puppies require long periods of undisturbed sleep, and close supervision when at play. In particular, owners need to ensure that children do not inadvertently drop them.

Please take note:
When bored, Corgis can become noisy, so responsible owners should always ensure that their dog has activities to occupy its day.



The Corgi is definitely a compatible canine companion, and they make delightful children's pets, but supervision is a must. Owners should be prepared to train their dogs to be disciplined in play and not get over-excited.